5 Vegetables That Grow Well In the Northeast

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Yesterday’s article presented five vegetables that grow well in the southeast, so today I will present five vegetables that are well-suited for the northeast portions of the U.S.

The northeast is known for its blizzard-impacted winters and short summer seasons. This type of climate makes it ideal for growing many cool weather crops.

Here are five vegetables that grow well in the northeast:

Beets

Beets Grow Well In the Northeast

Beets grow best in loose, fertile soil that is slightly alkaline. They can be grown for both the leafy green tops and the delicious round root.

Most beet varieties obtain poor taste if harvested in warm temperatures, so growing them in the slightly cooler northeast is ideal for the best growth and taste.

Aphids and flea beetles can damage the tops while Sugar-beet cyst nematodes can be a problem for the root.

Bull’s Blood, Chioggia, and Detroit Dark Red are all very good choices for beets.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb Grows Well In Cooler Climates

Rhubarb is a perennial plant that is famous for making rhubarb pie and pudding. It grows well in soil temperatures that are between 40 and 75 degrees F which makes it almost a must in the northeast vegetable garden.

Rhubarb should not be harvested until the second or third year of growth, and can be divided after several years if it becomes overcrowded.

MacDonald rhubarb is an excellent choice for the northeast.

Carrots

Carrots Are Relatively Easy to Grow In Northeast Vegetable Gardens

Although carrots can be grown successfully in a variety of climates, they grow very well in the northeast. Carrots have the best flavor when they receive a bit of frost, or allowed to overwinter.

Make sure the soil is loosen at least one foot deep for growing carrots so they have plenty of loose soil to grow in. To overwinter carrots simply trim the tops off a couple inches above the soil line, then cover with a thick layer of mulch for insulation.

Chantenay Red Cored, Danvers Half Long, Thumbelina carrots are all fun to grow in the northeast.

Spinach

Spinach Is a Favorite Among Many Northeast Gardeners

Spinach grows best when seeds are sowed directly into the vegetable garden. Seeds can germinate in soils that are as low as 35 degrees F in temperature. Spinach grows very well in the cooler temperatures of the northeast, which help to reduce the chances of early bolting.

Spinach can be susceptible to flea beetles and aphids. Use floating row covers to keep these pests from accessing our spinach crop.

Some great choices for spinach are Avon, Baby’s Leaf, and Palco.

Kale

Kale Grows Well In Northeast Vegetable Gardens

Kale is a member of the brassica plant family that tastes best when allowed to grow fast. It even holds up well during times of cold weather and snow.

Kale should be sown directly in the vegetable garden with well-amended soil. Flea beetles and cabbage worms can be a problem for kale. Use lightweight garden fabric to protect plants. Cabbage worms can be handpicked, or Thuricide can be used for heavy infestations.

Dwarf Blue Curled, and Red Winter kales are excellent for the northeast vegetable garden.

If you live in a different region than the northeast, check out these other areas for recommendations:

5 Vegetables That Grow Well In the Southeast

5 Vegetables That Grow Well In the Midwest

5 Vegetables That Grow Well In the Southwest

5 Vegetables That Grow Well In the Northwest

What other vegetables do you grow in your northeast vegetable garden?

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Comments

  1. hi i wanted to know why i have many zucchini flowers but no fruit? its july 23 here and i thought my plants would of at least produced one crop so far. what is wrong and what can i do to help them grow. also i have many many tomato and pepper plants and maybe only 1 or 2 now producing fruit, why s that?

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