Tomato Quirks Part 6 – Spotted Tomatoes

Tomato Quirks Part 6 - Spotted Tomatoes

This is Part Six of a seven part series on some quirks that can be found with tomatoes. If you missed the other Tomato Quirks articles, you can check them out here:

Tomato Quirks Part 1 – Catfacing

Tomato Quirks Part 2 – Bumpy Stems

Tomato Quirks Part 3 – Green Shoulders

Tomato Quirks Part 4 – Sunscald

Tomato Quirks Part 5 – Splits & Holes

Tomato Quirks Part 7 – Leaf Roll

What Is Causing The Spots On My Tomatoes?

A spotted tomato is most likely caused by Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV). TSWV can also occur in many other vegetables such as peppers, eggplant, and spinach among others. It is very difficult to detect in the early stages. Common symptoms of TSWV are discolored foliage, and dark brown or black streaks on the main stem. TSWV will also affect the fruit of the tomato by causing light-colored spots or swirls.Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

TSWV is spread from plant to plant by a nasty little critter called the thripe. Thripes are very tiny, measuring about 1/4 inch long, are green or brown in color, and are very difficult to detect.

Thripe

How Do I Prevent Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus?

The best way to prevent TSWV is to use controls for reducing thripes. Try using a floating row cover or plant tunnels for young tomato plants. These will cover the plants and reduce insect problems.

Make sure to keep weeds at bay around the garden area. High and thick weeds in or near the garden can invite thripes to the garden area and your precious tomato plants.

You can also apply a selective organic pesticide, such as Caterpillar Control, to the leaves of the tomato plants. Once a tomato plant is infected with TSWV, the plant should be removed from the garden, and promptly discarded or burned. This will help prevent the possible spread of the disease.

Tomorrow’s Tomato Quirk will be the final in the Tomato Quirks Series. Please make sure that you catch this article on leaf roll. It should be very interesting. To make sure you do not miss it, subscribe to out RSS Feed, or bookmark us!

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