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it is my first year gardening...i did ok..however every one of my corn had a corn worm and some of them had 2 corn worm..i need to learn how to controll this before i grow corn next season...please help if you can...
 

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I hope someone has an answer. I would love to grow some of that pretty colorful corn. I tried to grow corn this summer and last and they turn out so icky. I didn't realize it was worms though. I though it was bugs and birds and ended up ripping them out of the soil and tossing them.
 

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this was also my first year at growing corn, mine didn't have a worm issue but they where small ears. I do know corn requires a ton of nitrogen rich soil this means lots of fresh manure the more the merrier kinda thing.The fact is corn would be happy growing in the manure compost pile. now for the worm thing it sounds as though you need the help of a bunch of good bugs to get the bad bugs these need to be added in the spring and through out the growing season. that is if you want to do organic. I would give this web site a chance.http://www.arbico-organics.com/
 

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I know nothing about corn. However, I noticed on burpee.com that they have corn that you can grow in containers, maybe that can help in keeing some of those bad bugs away???
 

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Tips for Protecting Corn From Disease, Pests and Animals


Three things constantly threaten gardens: disease, insects and animals. Be sure to examine your plants for signs of damage and make sure you vary the times you check for infestation. Another pest you need to watch for is the corn earworm. Corn earworms are a problem in sweet corn every year. Moths deposit eggs on the developing silks or on leaves near the ear which become tiny caterpillars. The worms feed on the tip of the ear. Once the worm is inside the protective husk covering, there is no effective control. But there are things you can do to protect you corn plants.

Say No to Earworms


To protect the corn from earworms, you need to keep them from entering the tip of the husk. You can do this by wrapping a rubber band around the tip of the ear or you can attach a clothespin to the tip after the silk appears. Anything that restricts the worm from entering the tip of the husk will help decrease the damage. Another deterrent is to insert half a medicine dropper full of mineral oil to the dried corn silks. This will keep the worms from gripping the plants.

Keep the Birds Away

As the corn continues to grow, birds will pose the greatest threat to the crop. The best way to scare off birds is with a scarecrow. To frighten the birds, set up a scarecrow dressed in light flowing clothes that can move in the wind. You can also attach strips of aluminum foil to the scarecrow to increase the reflection of sunlight and movement in the garden. You can even use colored balloons or beach ball painted with large eyes to frighten the birds. Just be sure to change the scarecrow's location every few days so the birds don't get used to it being in one place.

Another way to keep birds from raking the corn crop, is to build a bird screen to cover your beds. Using a sledge hammer, drive stakes into the ground 8" deep. Next, stretch string from corner to corner and around the perimeter, tying the string to the stakes. You then attach sod staples to hold down one end of some protective netting. The netting will provide extra support for the cornstalks. Stretch the netting over the plot and secure it on the opposite side of the plot with the sod staples. Be sure to pull the netting tight and attach enough staples around the whole area to secure the netting over the plot.

Hoe Carefully

To control any weeds that pop up in the patch, you should hoe between the rows. Just be careful not to hoe deeply or you may damage the stalks or the roots. You can also spread mulch around the base to control the weeds and to help conserve moisture.

Harvesting Healthy Corn

If you find smut, a swollen black pustule in the ear, break off the infected part of the ear. The remainder of the cob is suitable for eating. Be sure to place the galls in the garbage or burn them to keep the galls from spreading. Do not discard near the garden. Though it's not poisonous, it can be unpleasant to handle.

http://www.diynetwork.com/outdoors/...orn-from-disease-pests-and-animals/index.html
 
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