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The story is long and quite fascinating, which I will tell you all but first I have a pressing question which due to limited time in the moment and trying to find the answer to the the posted question below, and finding you, I would appreciate having the question answered today and will then post my story. OK???? And rather than confuse the issue and post what I think it means, please help me with your clarity.

What does it mean when the instructions for sowing say the following:
"Seed Spacing 2 seeds every 4-6"; Thinning: When 1" tall, thin to 1 ever 4-6"".


Thank you for your time and patience.
Royal Organics
Jupiter Farms Florida
Zone 10

Make It A Great Day!
 

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is this a trick question....i think it means plant 2 seeds every 4 to 6 inches...when they are one inch tall pluck out the weakest of the two...with one seed remaining every 4 to 6 inches...lol..i could be wrong.
 

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perfect answer. but with very small seeds it is hard to do such as carrot seeds. so if you dribble them slowly into a trench of sorts and thin when you can tell they are carrots or the plant you have planted. basically if you can identify the plant thin it to the appropriate spacing to grow the veggies intended.
 

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Tku for your reply. It was not a trick question. I just didn't get why you would put 2 seeds in one space, chancing that both would be strong but forcing one to be weak and then losing that one that shows up weak due to competition in the space. If the seed is inherently weak then it won't produce and so be it. But why compromise the integrity of the seed from the get go?
 

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because not all seeds will germinate and there for if you plant 2 in one space you will have at least one of the 2 germinate. if a seed isn't fertile it won't grow into a plant. the better the quality of seed you purchase the better the odds of most of the seeds germinating this also holds true for older seeds. some seeds stay viable for 6 mo others for 50 yrs it all depends on how strong the original plant was/is.
 

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also if you plant only one seed it might not germinate and you might have waited up to 14 days to find that out...then you will have to replant and wait another 14 days...that equals precious time lost ...
 

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another thing that can happen is both seeds are strong and grow well. but you can possibly separate them being careful not to pull them both up and transplant one to another space thus getting more in your harvest.
 
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